Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - H.R. 3523 - 112th Congress


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China, in particular, is engaged in an extensive, day-in, day-out effort to pillage American corporate and government information. While the government is already doing much to provide support and assistance to the private sector to address this threat, in particular through the Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, more can and should be done in the immediate future.

Under the DIB Pilot, the government provides classified threat intelligence to key Internet Service Providers, who use the information to protect a limited number of companies in the defense industrial base, all on a voluntary basis. The Committee determined that these issues are best resolved in the first instance by providing clear, positive authority to permit the monitoring—by the private sector—of privately-owned and operated networks and systems for the purpose of detecting cybersecurity threats and to permit the voluntary sharing of information about those threats and vulnerabilities with others, including entities within the private sector and with the federal government.

In the view of the Committee, an approach based on voluntary, private sector defense of private systems and networks, informed by government intelligence information, best protects individual privacy and takes advantage of the natural incentives built into our economic system, including harnessing private sector drive and innovation. The Committee believes that immediate and serious action is necessary to staunch the bleeding of American corporate research and development information and to better protect our national security.

Enacting H. Amendment No.

Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act

Langevin D-RI , Lungren R-CA : This amendment would expand eligibility to participate in the information sharing program to include critical infrastructure owners and operators, such as airports, utilities, and public transit systems, to receive cyber threat information and better secure their networks. Conyers D-MI : This amendment would strike the criminal and civil liability exemption for decisions made based upon cyber threat information identified, obtained, or shared under this Act.

Jackson-Lee D-TX : This amendment would authorize the Secretary of Homeland Security to intercept and deploy countermeasure with regard to system traffic for cybersecurity purposes and risks to federal systems. Quayle R-AZ , Eshoo D-CA , Thompson D-CA , Broun R-GA : This amendment would limit government use of shared cyber threat information to only 5 purposes: 1 cybersecurity; 2 investigation and prosecution of cybersecurity crimes; 3 protection of individuals from the danger of death or physical injury; 4 protection of minors from physical or psychological harm; and 5 protection of the national security of the United States.

Mulvaney R-SC , Dicks D-WA : This amendment would authorize the federal government to create reasonable procedures to protect privacy and civil liberties, consistent with the needs of cybersecurity.

Michigan State Senate

The amendment would also prohibit the federal government from retaining or using information shared pursuant to the Act for anything other than a use permitted under the provisions in the bill. Flake R-AZ : This amendment would add a requirement to include a list of all federal agencies receiving information shared with the federal government to the report from the Inspector General of the Intelligence Community required under the bill. Richardson D-CA : This amendment would add a provision allowing a department or agency of the federal government to provide cyber threat information to owners and operators of critical infrastructure.

Pompeo R-KS : This amendment would clarify that nothing in the bill would alter existing authorities or provide new authority to any federal agency, including Department of Defense, National Security Agency, Department of Homeland Security, or the Intelligence Community to install, employ, or otherwise use cybersecurity systems on private sector networks.

Woodall R-GA : This amendment would add a provision stating that entities who choose not to participate in the voluntary information sharing authorized by this bill are not subject to new liabilities. Goodlatee R-VA : This amendment would narrow definitions in the bill regarding what information may be identified, obtained, and shared.


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Turner R-OH : This amendment would make a technical correction to definitions in Section 2 g to provide consistency with other cyber security policies within the Executive branch and the Department of Defense. Mulvaney R-SC : This amendment would sunset the provisions of the bill five years after the date of enactment. Paulsen R-MN : This amendment would encourage international cooperation on cyber security where feasible.

The letter, entitled "Multi-Industry Letter Regarding Cybersecurity Legislative Priorities" can be down-loaded by clicking on the highlighted title link.

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Bertot, John Carlo, et al. With an eye toward the future, we examine the extent to which the discourses and practices of the past decade have contributed to shaping and reshaping our information environment, how the information field has responded in the ten years since this defining event, and why and how information professionals ought to remain engaged in these matters in the future.

Dane, Kristopher.

STOP CISPA

Hintz, Arne. Abstract: Two recent developments — the WikiLeaks releases and the Arab Spring — have demonstrated the capacities of individuals and movements in advancing free expression, transparency and social change through the use of online and social media. However they have also highlighted new sets of challenges and threats that interfere with, and restrict, such media uses. In this article I will present an analytical framework for understanding and investigating these contemporary restrictions to freedom of expression, based on the dimensions of information control, access to infrastructure, critical resources and applications, surveillance, and physical repression.

http://do-test.es.net/7680-cines-alhondiga.php

Cyber Defence

The model takes into account current trends such as the use of intermediaries in control regimes, and provides a global perspective that incorporates restrictions in both East and West. Further, I will outline how free expression advocates and civil society campaigns, such as the Icelandic Modern Media Initiative IMMI , have contested these practices, and discuss whether their agendas confirm the issue areas highlighted above.

Nojeim, Gregory T.

Ideas about how to address this problem abound and are being put into legislation that members of Congress are eager to advance. Some are obviously needed, have little downside, and should have been enacted years ago. But, a surprisingly large handful cut the wrong way; while well-intentioned, these ideas for statutory changes to deal with the significant cyber-security problems we face could backfire and make us less secure.

Unlike administrative initiatives adopted entirely within the discretion of the executive branch—and which can be revised or repealed just as easily—policy choices embodied in statutes can be revised only through subsequent legislation, making such decisions very difficult to reverse even when their negative impact becomes apparent.


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Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - H.R. 3523 - 112th Congress Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - H.R. 3523 - 112th Congress
Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - H.R. 3523 - 112th Congress Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - H.R. 3523 - 112th Congress
Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - H.R. 3523 - 112th Congress Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - H.R. 3523 - 112th Congress
Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - H.R. 3523 - 112th Congress Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - H.R. 3523 - 112th Congress
Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - H.R. 3523 - 112th Congress Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - H.R. 3523 - 112th Congress
Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - H.R. 3523 - 112th Congress Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - H.R. 3523 - 112th Congress

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